Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury I am so glad that I decided to read this book! I absolutely loved it. I would even say that it is one of my all time favourites.

[a:Ray Bradbury|1630|Ray Bradbury|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1361491094p2/1630.jpg] was an amazing writer. He captured relearning how to think perfectly. It makes the book so much more authentic for the dystopia he has created. It is fascinating to watch Guy Montag's thoughts progress throughout the course of the novel. Although, to me, it was fairly obvious that Clarisse was the trigger for thinking, I didn't envision her dying. I thought she was going to be involved in Montag's journey--more than the spark, but even though she dies, Montag brings her along for his journey any ways. At the turning points in the novel, where Montag could have just given up he thinks of her. Mildred's fate is definitely a sad one, however from what we know of her she has pretty much already died. Her role in the novel (I think) is to show the way that the society has mind washed the people. She blindly follows orders, she doesn't think, she spends her days glued to the massive TV's that she calls her 'family'. Her overdose at the beginning of the novel, to me, signified that she, as a unique person, had died. She had to have her blood pumped out or she would have died. So she, from that point on, became completely dependant on the government. The concepts introduced in [b:Fahrenheit 451|4381|Fahrenheit 451|Ray Bradbury|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1351643740s/4381.jpg|1272463] are quite elaborate ideas, but then again The internet would have been science-fiction 200 years ago. I do love that the TV's interact with the viewer personally. I think in order to brainwash the masses, as is done in the novel, that would most definitely play a crucial part. The idea of the 'Hounds' is an extremely scary one, if that technology was to actually exist, anyone could kill someone while sitting at home. All it takes is the persons unique scent. Faber is a great representation of the previous generation. His character gives insight into the transition age. He grew up in a time that still had books and free thinking. At first I though the men that Montag meets on the other side of the river were just fugitives, but when they introduce their 'book-selves' their role in the correction of the dystopian society is made much clearer. I love that they are just planning on waiting the war out and passing their knowledge down. Granger is probably my favourite of the 'Travelling Books', his comparison of our history to the Phoenix is beautiful. It's not often that a dystopian society is sent on the correct path again in such a philosophical manner.
There was a silly damn bird called a Phoenix back before Christ, every few hundred years he built a pyre and burned himself up...And it looks like we're doing the same thing, over and over.